Posts Tagged ‘aging’

Alzheimer’s and Managing Money are Challenging Eldercare Issues

Monday, November 1st, 2010

When someone shows signs of dementia, or Alzheimer’s, one of the initial concerns is about finances. How are Mom and Dad managing their money?  Are they paying their home and car insurance? Are they paying their utility bills? Are they easy targets of elder abuse?

Determining when a person with dementia needs someone else to manage their money, or when someone is no longer capable of entering into a legal contract is not always easy. There is no exact answer or solution. Often doctors, lawyers and financial advisers are working in a “gray area.”

If you have concern that a loved one may not be capable of managing their money on their own, you may want to talk to them directly about it. Many times they will deny there is any trouble, and will say they don’t need help. Chances are they know they need help, and they are afraid. They don’t want to lose their independence or dignity. Some people won’t know when they need help. Talking about it opens the door for accepting assistance.

A next step would be to accompany your loved one to their physician’s visit, notifying the doctor ahead of time of your concerns. It is often times easier for an older person to accept a directive from a doctor rather than an adult child.

If your loved one needs help, you can assist in many ways, ranging from: monitoring their accounts online for suspicious transactions; helping them write their checks and managing the checkbook, and taking over all of their bill paying and financial responsibilities. Watch for potential elder fiduciary abuse through junk mail schemes, such as letters telling them they won the lottery or notices asking them to send money to “save their social security.”

This article touches on some of the thoughts and questions involved in the topic of elders and their finances. http://tiny.cc/ledrf

A geriatric care manager can be an excellent ally when talking to a loved one about difficult topics, or assess the situation neutrally and professionally.

Trust your instincts and watch for signs that your loved one may need more assistance. Be sensitive and compassionate, keeping in mind it is probably a sensitive and powerful issue for everyone involved.

AgingPro.com Participates in Aging Sensitivity Training

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

LONG BEACH, Calif., June 8 /PRNewswire/ — In an effort to better serve Long Beach-area seniors, staff members from local legislators’ offices and community agencies recently participated in an interactive senior sensitivity training program sponsored by SCAN Health Plan. The award-winning Trading Ages(TM) program is a workshop that provides participants the opportunity to literally “walk in the shoes of a senior” through a series of hands-on exercises and sensory perception education.

“Through this program SCAN provides an invaluable opportunity to feel, see and hear the common physical and emotional challenges that are a part of the aging process,” said Long Beach Assembly Member Bonnie Lowenthal, who co-hosted the training with SCAN. “As society ages it is incumbent upon all of us to better understand what it’s like to grow older and raise our level of appreciation for seniors and what they confront.”

In addition to Assembly Member Lowenthal’s staff members, among those taking part in the day’s workshop were staff from the Long Beach City Council Offices, Long Beach Police Department, Long Beach Senior Advisory Commission, Los Angeles District Attorneys Office’s Victim Assistance Program, Santa Monica Police Department Elder Abuse Unit, and Long Beach-based Pathways Volunteer Hospice as well as Agingpro.com, an online eldercare resource.

Read entire press release   http://tiny.cc/N5R3V

Aging Humor: Never Stop Laughing

Monday, May 18th, 2009

You don’t stop laughing because you grow old, You grow old because you stop laughing!!

My memory’s not as sharp as it used to be. Also, my memory’s not as sharp as it used to be.

Just before the funeral services, the undertaker came up to the very elderly widow and asked, “How old was your husband?” “98” she replied, “Two years older than me.” “So you’re 96,” the undertaker commented. She responded, “Hardly worth going home, is it?”

AgingPro Caregiving Tip: What is Mine to Do?

Friday, May 8th, 2009

AgingPro Caregiving Tip: What is Mine to Do?
When caring for an older loved one, it is important to ask yourself, “What is mine to do in this situation?” Some caregivers will find themselves called to give hands-on assistance, others will donate money, food or time, and still others will do nothing. Be aware that each person is doing the best they can at the moment.

Building resentment over what others are or are not doing in the caregiving role is neither productive nor healthy—for you, for them, or for your loved one. Determine what is yours to do, and do it to the best of your ability. You can’t possibly do everything that you think needs to be done. Tell yourself and your loved one, “I love you, and I’m going to do the best I can with what I have and with what I know.”

Aging Humor: Life is a Journey to Enjoy

Friday, March 6th, 2009

‘Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways – Danish in one hand – chocolate in the other – body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming ‘WOO HOO, What a Ride’
———————
While working for an organization that delivers lunches to elderly shut-ins, I used to take my four-year-old daughter on my afternoon rounds. She was unfailingly intrigued by the various appliances of old age, particularly the canes, walkers and wheelchairs.
One day I found her staring at a pair of false teeth soaking in a glass. As I braced myself for the inevitable barrage of questions, she merely turned and whispered, “The tooth fairy will never believe this!”

Aging Humor: Perks of Being Older

Friday, March 6th, 2009

Perks of Being Older

1)  There is little left to learn the hard way
2)  Things you buy now won’t wear out
3)  You can quit trying to suck in your stomach, no matter who walks in the room
4)  You can eat dinner at 4PM and get the early bird special
5)  You are no longer viewed as a hypochondriac
6)  Your joints are more accurate meteorologists than the weather person on TV

Aging means changing

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

I’ve been contemplating why it is that most people loathe the idea of growing older. If you ask someone’s age, many people hesitate to answer, as if not admitting it will slow the aging process.  Is it all about the potential loss – loss of independence, loss of mental, physical or sensory abilities?

While working with my 20-month old daughter in her bottle drinking habits, I realized – humans don’t easily embrace change at any age. My daughter likes bottles in the morning, nap time and before bed. Who wouldn’t! She wants things to stay the same. She is not liking the change. It is not easy to change as we age, at any age.

Can I look at aging as changing – instead of something to dread, fear, fight or ignore? Can I embrace the change, even celebrate?  I am going to age whether I like it or not.

Again, I am reminded that this is an attitude. The good news about that is that my attitude is something I have control over.

More musings…